• Why won't the Associated Press correct wrong times on Bhutto murder crime photos? Why won't the Associated Press correct wrong times on Bhutto murder crime photos?

    Starting this month, our international news stories will be cross-posted on Pakistan's Express Tribune, a partner of the International Herald Tribune. This is Part 4 of our special investigation on the Bhutto crime scene press coverage. See Parts 123

    Pakistan’s former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was murdered at 5:16 p.m. in a suicide attack in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on Thursday, Dec. 27, 2007. These facts are incontrovertible.

  • Mrs. Bhutto's Murder Anniversary Part 2: Exclusive Interview with Icon from Benazir Bhutto Murder Mrs. Bhutto's Murder Anniversary Part 2: Exclusive Interview with Icon from Benazir Bhutto Murder

    Editor's Note :FOUR YEARS AGO, MRS. BENAZIR BHUTTO WAS MURDERED. Who was the Man in the Brown Jacket? Newspapers around the world featured an emotional man in a brown jacket walking among the splattered human remains in the aftermath of the suicide bomb and gun fire that took her life and the lives of twenty-four other people.The photo captions speculated that he was a Bhutto follower, but the journalists present at the assassination scene never asked him his name. The grisly images on the Associated Press website have incorrect time stamps. Why? Our six-part special investigation, to be published during the weeklong anniversary of Mrs. Bhutto's death, explores these questions and more.

  • A New Campaign for a Polio-Free Pakistan A New Campaign for a Polio-Free Pakistan

    Written by Malik Ayub Sumbal Mon,20 January 2014 | 07:00 “This is the story of a family who lives in a village. Rahim Ullah is 13 years old, his sister Batool is 10, and his brother Gullu is only 4. Their parents work hard so they can stay healthy. But their neighbour Amina died because of polio.”

  • The shawl weavers of Pakistan: Keeping alive a dying art The shawl weavers of Pakistan: Keeping alive a dying art

    Blatant exploitation by middlemen may force these traditional artisans out of business By Malik Ayub Sumbal, Correspondent January 14, 2014

  • Can Pakistan save Erdogan? Can Pakistan save Erdogan?

    Facing a widening crisis at home, Erdogan goes on a charm offensive in Pakistan. Last updated: 03 Jan 2014 09:51 Malik Ayub Sumbal Malik Ayub Sumbal Malik Ayub Sumbal is an award-winning journalist currently based in Islamabad.

  • Pakistan's most powerful man? Pakistan's most powerful man?

    Will the appointment of a new army chief end the era of military meddling in politics?

  • Unsung efforts of a brave teacher in Pakistan Unsung efforts of a brave teacher in Pakistan

    The woman in her 20s travels 70km daily to a remote area in Punjab to teach more than 200 pupils By Malik Ayub Sumbal, Correspondent Published: 21:18 November 22, 2013

  • Did Pakistan's The Daily Express Break Off-the-Record Agreement? Did Pakistan's The Daily Express Break Off-the-Record Agreement?

    ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN --To violate off-the-record agreements for information and sources is an ethical violation according to the principles and values of journalism, but it happens alll too frequently in countries like Pakistan where the reporters and editors sometimes still fail to differentiate between on-the-record and off-the-record.

  • Ostrich farming on the rise Ostrich farming on the rise

    Number of farms is growing as consumers are looking for cheaper sources of meat By Malik Ayub Sumbal Correspondent Published: 21:50 November 15, 2013

  •  The dying roar: endangered Snow Leopards of Pakistan The dying roar: endangered Snow Leopards of Pakistan

    Snow leopard is considered as an indicator of health for mountainous ecosystem in region

    Islamabad: Amongst the family of large cats, Panthera Uncia or the Snow Leopard is one of the most charismatic species. Like most animal species with a majestic skin, the snow leopard is at the verge of extinction. The animal is listed as endangered on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species and Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

  • Pakistan minority rights champion protests against drones Pakistan minority rights champion protests against drones

    We want the world to know that Pakistan is a peaceful country’ Malik Ayub Sumbal, Correspondent Published: 17:21 November 7, 2013

  • Polio eradication program threatened in Pakistan Polio eradication program threatened in Pakistan

    Thanks to a massive global campaign, Polio - a crippling illness which used to kill and paralyzes half a million people every year - is only endemic in a handful of countries today. But in Pakistan, many children don't get the vaccination. Extremists there tell parents it’s dangerous for their children to get vaccinated and attack health workers. That could lead to a revival of Polio in Pakistan.

  • The finest moustache in Pakistan The finest moustache in Pakistan

    Malik Amir Muhammad Khan Afridi's moustache is so luxuriant that it has made him a target of Islamist extremists. Report: Malik Ayub Sumbal, presented by Andre Leslie

  • The Plight of Pakistan’s Christian Minority The Plight of Pakistan’s Christian Minority

    Before September 22, 2013, Christians in Pakistan defined history in two parts: before the blasphemy laws and after the blasphemy laws. That definition has now changed. History is now split into a time before the Peshawar tragedy and after. The suicide bombings in Peshawar changed the way Christian minority thinks about the concept of nationalism.

  • Pakistani Christians alone and vulnerable Pakistani Christians alone and vulnerable

    The families of those killed in the deadliest-ever attack on minority Christians in Pakistan say the government should have done more to protect them. Report: Malik Ayub Sumbal, presented by Samantha Early

  • Rallies, mourning follows massive suicide bombing at Pakistan church Rallies, mourning follows massive suicide bombing at Pakistan church

    In Pakistan, rallies denouncing Sunday's deadly suicide attack at a church were held in cities across the country, as families in Peshawar continued to bury their loved ones. More than 90 people died and many more were seriously wounded. FSRN's Malik Ayub Sumbal has more.

     

  • Fighting to educate Pakistan's girls Fighting to educate Pakistan's girls

    Mehreen Khan has been the sole teacher at a girl's school in a remote Pakistani village for over eight years. Her father drives her to work every day, enabling her to fulfill her dream to give girls access to an education.

    Report: Malik Ayub Sumbal, Pakistan; Presenter: André Leslie

  • A Wife's Mission A Wife's Mission

    Amina Masood Janjua last saw her husband eight years ago. Since his disappearance, she's become one of Pakistan's most prominent campaigners for justice for the families of hundreds of innocent people unwittingly swept up in the USA's "war on terror".

  • In Pakistan, Juctice on Your Door Step In Pakistan, Juctice on Your Door Step

    Pakistan recently launched a mobile court in the city of Peshawar.

    This courtroom-on-wheels will mediate small civil and minor criminal cases as well as cases involving children.

  • In Pakistan’s Swat Valley, female Jirga brings new voices to all-male tradition In Pakistan’s Swat Valley, female Jirga brings new voices to all-male tradition

    Among the majority Pashtun Tribes in Afghanistan and Pakistan, a conference of elders, called a jirga, is a centuries old tradition. It’s used to resolve disputes and hear criminal cases. Jirga members and their decisions are respected by the community. But until recently, the tradition has been entirely run by men, with women cut out of the process.  Now, a female Jirga has been formed in the Pashtun majority area of Swat in Pakistan. The first of its kind, the “Khwaindo Tolana” or sisters’ group, holds meetings and makes decision like any other Jirga in the country. From Swat, Pakistan FSRN’s Malik Ayub Sumbal has more.

  • JUSTICE Housewife inspires families of Pakistan's 'disappeared' JUSTICE Housewife inspires families of Pakistan's 'disappeared'

    A housewife's refusal to remain silent has given new hope to the families of Pakistan's 'disappeared.' Hundreds are thought to have become inadvertently swept up in the 'war on terror.'

  • Meet Burka Avenger, Pakistan's First Female Hero Meet Burka Avenger, Pakistan's First Female Hero

    Wearing a black burka and armed with books and pens, she's here to defend girls' education rights.

    Please welcome, Pakistan's first female hero: Burka Avenger.

    Malik Ayub Sumbal takes a look at this ground-breaking cartoon character that hit Pakistani national TV last week.

  • Meet Burka Avenger, Pakistan’s First Female Hero Meet Burka Avenger, Pakistan’s First Female Hero

    Don’t mess with the lady in black!

    Covered in a black burka, armed with books and pens, she’s here to defend girls’ education rights.

    Please welcome, Pakistan’s first female hero to save the day: Burka Avenger.

  • Pakistan Jailbreaks: Peshawar Next? Pakistan Jailbreaks: Peshawar Next?

    So what is the most secure place on earth? Fort Knox? Guantanamo Bay detention camp? A high security prison in Pakistan housing high-profile convicted terrorists and criminals?

  • A prodigal Pakistani son returns A prodigal Pakistani son returns

    As many as 1.5 million children in Pakistan live on the streets. For six years, the Ali family feared that their son had joined those ranks. Then, out of the blue, he returned to his home village on a special bus that is part of a Ramadan project.

    Report: Malik Ayub Sumbal, read by Andre Leslie

  • Pakistani Women Not Safe in Government Safe House Pakistani Women Not Safe in Government Safe House

    In Pakistan, it’s not easy for women to choose who they want to marry. And if they do, they may be accused of bringing shame on their families, and become victims of “honour killings”.

  • Stock of relief goods comes to an end Stock of relief goods comes to an end

    The stock of relief goods at the Emergency Relief Cell working under Cabinet Division has ended due to shortage of funds...

  • Norwegian ambassador encourages broader Pakistan view Norwegian ambassador encourages broader Pakistan view

    ‘Pakistan is much more than the scandals and a lot of propaganda which is being published in to the international media,’ Norway’s ambassador to Pakistan, Cecilie Landsverk tells The Foreigner in an exclusive interview at the Islamabad embassy.

  • Pakistan's third gender gets recognition Pakistan's third gender gets recognition

    It's estimated that there are between 100,000 to 300,000 transgendered people, or hijras, living in Pakistan - many of them excluded from the conventional job market and forced into prostitution, begging, or - vastly preferable - dancing.

  • The Plight of the Hazaras in Pakistan The Plight of the Hazaras in Pakistan

    What sort of reaction would you expect from the international community if more than a thousand people belonging to a particular ethnic group were targeted for violent attacks within the span of a few months? Would it bring the international upholders of peace and harmony to the region? Would it spark a mass public awareness campaign for the rights of those targeted? Well if it were the Hazara people in Baluchistan, it apparently would do nothing of the kind.

  • Growing Awareness of Consumer’s Rights in Pakistan Growing Awareness of Consumer’s Rights in Pakistan

    Punjab province in Pakistan is considered to have the country’s most progressive consumer council, along with a number of district consumer courts.

  • Dying Tourism in Pakistan Affects Workers Dying Tourism in Pakistan Affects Workers

    The workers of Pakistan Tourism Development Corporation staged a protest demonstration in front of their head office in Islamabad against the corruption (Photo: Malik Ayub Sumbal)

  • Pakistani Lesbian Couple Wed in UK Pakistani Lesbian Couple Wed in UK

    Two young Pakistani women have married in a civil partnership in the UK, becoming the first Muslim lesbians to wed. The news has shocked the conservative masses in their native Pakistan, where LGBT groups are shunned by both law and custom, albeit largely left alone provided they retain a low profile.

  • Speaking for the few and the many Speaking for the few and the many

    J. Salik is a charismatic Christian leader who advocates for minority rights in Pakistan.

  • Chinese Premier Li’s Visit to Pakistan: Hope Meets Reality Chinese Premier Li’s Visit to Pakistan: Hope Meets Reality

    For Chinese Premier Li Keqiang’s first visit, what Pakistan keenly sought was a show of mutual adoration, along with pledges to rejuvenate the undying friendship both nations love to proclaim. Certainly, Pakistan’s intentions were in abundant evidence for Li’s welcome, which started with his plane being ushered in by Pakistani fighter aircraft and an airport reception that brought out the country’s entire civilian and military leadership.

  • How the ETIM Enigma Haunts Pakistan-China Relations How the ETIM Enigma Haunts Pakistan-China Relations

    The children in the video look to be as young as 6. They are shown firing handguns, AK-47 assault rifles and machine guns at what appears to be a training camp. For Pakistan, the video may well prove a major headache, as the camp is apparently located in the volatile North Waziristan tribal area of the country, but is operated by a Chinese rebel force known as the East Turkestan Islamic Movement (ETIM), or the Turkestan Islamic Party.

  • Anti Polio Health Workers Live Dangerously in Pakistan Anti Polio Health Workers Live Dangerously in Pakistan

    Anti Polio Health Workers Live Dangerously in Pakistan

  • First Women to Take Part in Elections 2013 from Tribal Area First Women to Take Part in Elections 2013 from Tribal Area

    First time in history of Pakistan a woman is taking part in elections from Tribal Areas of Pakistan, where womens are only bound to live in house.

  • A Dangerous Profession A Dangerous Profession

    A community mourns the murder of a teacher who dared to work at a girls' school in north-western Pakistan.

  •  Shiite Uprising Sets Off Alarm Bells for Saudi Arabia Shiite Uprising Sets Off Alarm Bells for Saudi Arabia

    Saudi Arabia's anti-Shiite policies are leading the country closer to the worst clash of the Shiite and Sunni schools of thought in the history of the Kingdom, a clash which will branch throughout the rest of the Muslim world.

  • Ex Pakistan intelligence chief calls for Norway agent arrests Ex Pakistan intelligence chief calls for Norway agent arrests

    ISLAMABAD: Norway-Pakistan relations could become embittered following Police Security Service (PST) Director Janne Kristiansen’s revelations about espionage agents in the country.

  •  Fact Check: News Outlets Wrongly Report Christians Fleeing Pakistani Village of Christian Girl Koran Burning Case Fact Check: News Outlets Wrongly Report Christians Fleeing Pakistani Village of Christian Girl Koran Burning Case

    A young Pakistani Christian girl, Rimsha Masih, approximately 14 years old with diminished mental capacity, was jailed with the charge of blasphemy after being accused by a Muslim neighbor of burning the pages from the Holy Koran, as the story goes. Last week, reports by news outlets including Voice of America and the Washington Post, claimed that the accusations against the girl prompted her Christian neighbors to "flee their homes."   And this past weekend, a Muslim imam, Khalid Jadoon Chishti, was arrested and accused of "stashing pages of a Quran" in the girl's bag to make her look guilty.

  • ISI accused of manipulating Osama probe ISI accused of manipulating Osama probe

    ISLAMABAD - Pakistan's top spy agency, Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), has been accused of harassing witnesses appearing at the country's investigation into the United States military raid that last year killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

  • Militants warn Pakistan over tribal offensive Militants warn Pakistan over tribal offensive

    ISLAMABAD - A brazen attack by Pakistani Taliban militants on Minhas Airbase in Punjab province on early Thursday will likely make the country's military think twice about an offensive it is planning in the restive North Waziristan Agency.

  • Pakistan's courts take on the ISI Pakistan's courts take on the ISI

    Pakistan's Supreme Court has ordered the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) spy agency to close a notorious cell that focused on monitoring internal politics, in a direct challenge to the ISI's ability to operate as a "state within a state".

  • Fury grows at Islamabad's NATO u-turn Fury grows at Islamabad's NATO u-turn

    ISLAMABAD - Tens of thousands of activists from banned jihadi organizations arrived in Islamabad this week to protest the government's decision last week to re-open the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) supply route from Pakistan to Afghanistan.

  • Mumbai claims muddy supply-line talks Mumbai claims muddy supply-line talks

    ISLAMABAD - Allegations made public by the Indian intelligence agencies as they question Syed Zaibuddin Ansari, the suspected mastermind of the 2008 Mumbai attacks, are producing a bitter chill between Pakistan and India, just as Islamabad is working on an uncertain thaw in relations with the United States.

  • Gilani pays the price for loyalty Gilani pays the price for loyalty

    ISLAMABAD - Pakistan's ruling party and its coalition members are scrambling to nominate a new prime minister following the disqualification of Yousuf Raza Gilani for contempt of court.

  • Pakistan Newspaper Plagiarized News Photos Pakistan Newspaper Plagiarized News Photos

    ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN Dateline Islamabad violated photojournalism ethical standards by plagiarizing copyrighted photographs from two other news agencies, ONLINE and Independent News Pakistan INP.

  • New controversy: AQ Khan dives into The Atlantic New controversy: AQ Khan dives into The Atlantic

    In an exclusive interview with iMediaEthics, Abdul Qadeer Khan, the metallurgist blamed by the West for making Pakistan a nuclear power, condemned inaccuracies in The Atlantic magazine’s November 2005 cover story, which he says falsely accused him of a ‘brazen act of illegality’ when it claimed his Rawalpindi house was “built in blatant disregard of the law.”

  • Why A.Q. Khan Breaks Interview Ban for iMediaEthics, His Wrath over The Atlantic, William Langewiesche's 'Lies,' The Atlantic Fact Checker's Fail Why A.Q. Khan Breaks Interview Ban for iMediaEthics, His Wrath over The Atlantic, William Langewiesche's 'Lies,' The Atlantic Fact Checker's Fail

    In an exclusive interview with iMediaEthics, Abdul Qadeer Khan, the Pakistani metallurgist blamed by the West for making Pakistan a nuclear power, condemned inaccuracies in The Atlantic magazine’s November 2005 cover story that falsely accused him of a “brazen act of illegality” when his “large weekend house” in Islamabad was “built in blatant disregard of the law.”

  • Telenor tries to placate Pakistan Telenor tries to placate Pakistan

    The Norwegian telecoms giant, that already has a bad name in Pakistani religious circles, has suffered extremist attacks on company franchises due to the company’s association with Nordic countries following publication of the blasphemous Prophet Muhammad caricatures.

  • Law, Journalism and Media Ethics join in Pakistan Law, Journalism and Media Ethics join in Pakistan

    The crime and court beats are considered some of the most difficult parts of journalism in every part of the world, but journalists in Pakistan mostly depend upon the police and intelligence agencies for 90 percent of the information they use in their news stories.

  • Mrs. Bhutto's Murder Anniversary Part 3: VIDEO Interview with Icon from Benazir Bhutto Assassination Mrs. Bhutto's Murder Anniversary Part 3: VIDEO Interview with Icon from Benazir Bhutto Assassination

    Editor's Note :FOUR YEARS AGO, MRS. BENAZIR BHUTTO WAS MURDERED. Who was the Man in the Brown Jacket? Newspapers around the world featured an emotional man in a brown jacket walking among the splattered human remains in the aftermath of the suicide bomb and gun fire that took her life and the lives of twenty-four other people.The photo captions speculated that he was a Bhutto follower, but the journalists present at the assassination scene never asked him his name. The grisly images on the Associated Press website have incorrect time stamps. Why? Our six-part special investigation, to be published during the weeklong anniversary of Mrs. Bhutto's death, explores these questions and more.
     

  • Mrs. Bhutto's Murder Anniversary Part 1: Troubling Double Standard, American photojournalism's different treatment of foreign victims Mrs. Bhutto's Murder Anniversary Part 1: Troubling Double Standard, American photojournalism's different treatment of foreign victims

    Editor's Note :FOUR YEARS AGO, MRS. BENAZIR BHUTTO WAS MURDERED. Who was the Man in the Brown Jacket? Newspapers around the world featured an emotional man in a brown jacket walking among the splattered human remains in the aftermath of the suicide bomb and gun fire that took her life and the lives of twenty-four other people.The photo captions speculated that he was a Bhutto follower, but the journalists present at the assassination scene never asked him his name. The grisly images on the Associated Press website have incorrect time stamps. Why? Our six-part special investigation, to be published during the weeklong anniversary of Mrs. Bhutto's death, explores these questions and more.

  • Ethnic Division of Pakistan: More Dhaka-like Debacles in the Offing Ethnic Division of Pakistan: More Dhaka-like Debacles in the Offing

    Islamabad — The ethnic division of Pakistan could lead the country towards more debacles like the fall of Dhaka in 1971, as the movements for new provinces are gaining momentum, with the Pakistan People's Party (PPP) in forefront in favor of carving out Saraiki province from Punjab.

  • Pakistan's Iran overtures test Saudi faith Pakistan's Iran overtures test Saudi faith

    ISLAMABAD - Saudi Arabian concerns over Pakistan's improving ties with Iran will likely be worsened by reports that Islamabad sent a secret delegation of hard-nosed and devout Sunni scholars to Tehran with the aim of fostering interfaith harmony with their Shi'ite counterparts.

  • Pakistan bows to journalists' pressure Pakistan bows to journalists' pressure

    ISLAMABAD - The Pakistan government has formed a judicial commission headed by a Supreme Court judge to probe the murder of Asia Times Online Pakistan bureau chief Syed Saleem Shahzad, after journalist organizations staged an unprecedented protest.

  • Pakistan angered over 'failed' report Pakistan angered over 'failed' report

    ISLAMABAD - Pakistan ranks 12th on an index of failed states around the globe, according to a new report prepared by the Fund for Peace, an independent non-profit research and educational organization that works to prevent violent conflict and promote sustainable security in the world. Its neighbor Afghanistan ranks seventh. [1]

  • Police 'clueless' over Shahzad's killing Police 'clueless' over Shahzad's killing

    ISLAMABAD - Islamabad police have not made any progress investigating the death of Asia Timers Online Pakistan bureau chief Syed Saleem Shahzad, a top official from the force has told Asia Times Online.

  • Kashmiri: Most wanted - dead or alive Kashmiri: Most wanted - dead or alive

    ISLAMABAD - Doubts persist over whether or not Ilyas Kashmiri, the head of al-Qaeda's operational arm, has been killed in a United States Predator drone strike in Pakistan, with speculation swirling that reports of his demise might be a ploy to take the heat off the most wanted man in the region.

  • Killing of senior journalist rocks Pakistan’s media community Killing of senior journalist rocks Pakistan’s media community

     The killing of Syed Saleem Shahzad, a senior investigative reporter for the Hong Kong-based online newspaper Asian Times and an Italian news Adnkronos International (AKI) agency, has shattered Pakistan’s journalist’s community and is being considered a message to all the other journalists working on sensitive issues and beats. 

  • Defending the rights of young journalists in Pakistan Defending the rights of young journalists in Pakistan

    According to investigative journalist Malik Ayub Sumbal, the rights of young journalists in Pakistan are not being adequately protected by the main journalistic bodies in the country. Three years ago, he took matters into his own hands and together with a few colleagues, founded the Young Journalist Association.

  • Pakistan: Children with small heads exploited for beggary Pakistan: Children with small heads exploited for beggary

    No one knows about the reality and sad saga of these greenish veiled and shaved head individuals carried by their masters with a chain about their necks to get the sympathies of the masses for the sake of begging.

  • The curse of yellow journalism in Pakistan The curse of yellow journalism in Pakistan

    The rise of sensationalist media and yellow journalism in Pakistan has led to the emergence of a debate in various circles in the country about the accountability of the media and the journalistic profession.


    Yellow journalism is generally defined as the tabloidisation of journalism – the adoption of reporting practices focusing more on sensationalism than on research. In Pakistan, yellow journalism refers mostly to the exploitation and manipulation of issues of national interest for the vested interests of corrupt journalists.


    Corruption has become an integral part of Pakistani journalism. The monopoly corrupt journalists exercise over the profession constitutes a challenge for all media practitioners, because their influential positions make it hard for others to do their jobs properly.

    The media is ideally perceived as the fourth pillar of the state (alongside the judicial, legislative and executive powers), but in Pakistan, most people have come to distrust the media and those who practise journalism.

    The sensationalist aspect of newspapers and private news television channels and the problematic role they play in society raise increasing concern among the public.

    Presently, Pakistanis are demanding that star anchors of various current affairs programmes and other journalists be held accountable for their actions. The media in general and yellow journalists are criticised on various platforms, Internet forums and television programmes. People also resort to wall chalking against the practice of yellow journalism and media exaggeration in the streets of major cities.

    Corruption at the root of the problem

    Beat reporters and desk editors at the leading English and Urdu newspapers in Pakistan are reluctant to publish news stories without receiving some sort of gift or reward. Bribes in the shape of currency appear to be the quickest way to get an article published.

    Hassan Sardar, a public relations officer of a multinational company operating in Pakistan, said: “It is impossible to get coverage of a news event in any leading English-language newspaper without giving a bribe or a gift of some sort to the news editors and beat reporters.” Sardar explained that if he depended solely on the newsworthiness of a specific event, it would be virtually impossible to see the item in the press the next day.

    Multinational corporations and NGOs appeal to senior reporters and editors by inviting them to various events. In order to receive attention on press clippings, NGOs and multinationals resort to bribing journalists. For the sake of news coverage, every organisation has a special budget specifically dedicated to this purpose.

    Senior journalist, Matiullah Jan, has for the first time voiced a concern from within the Pakistani media about the accountability of journalists and famous television anchors, whose conduct in everyday life contradicts their public statements against yellow journalism.

    Matiullah Jan, who exposed the journalists’ corrupt practices and scandals in the Dawn News series “Apna Gareban”, which started in January 2011, now faces a wave of criticisms from journalists’ associations and unions.

    Jan unveiled the questionable relationship that yellow journalists entertain with politicians and the privileges they have obtained from the present political regime.

    Pakistani journalist

    He revealed that journalists and television anchors were illegally renting out the cheapest residential apartments in the expensive federal capital of Islamabad. He also exposed journalists who are receiving extraordinary favours and privileges from the government, thus abusing their position and undermining the profession.

    Pakistani politicians keep loyal yellow journalists on their payroll and use them to misinform public opinion and promote their image in the public arena.

    These practices are possible because journalists receive negligible salaries and several organisations fail to pay their reporters altogether, due to the financial crunch or simply as a result of poor management in the newspaper or media house.


    Following Matiullah Jan’s statements on television, the yellow journalism lobby became annoyed and took action by posting banners in Islamabad condemning the programme.

    Jan said in reaction: “The majority of district correspondents and stringers of a number of dailies and news channels in Pakistan are associated with smugglings, burglaries and other criminal activities. The ‘yellow’ press provides them with a cover. They use their press cards to save their skins”.

    Jan went on to say that these so-called journalists “are using fake press cards to put pressure on law enforcement agencies and other governmental bodies”. There are scores of ‘dummy’ newspapers in the country, without any real identity or even circulation, engaging in yellow journalism and blackmailing.

    “If yellow journalism in Pakistan is not controlled, the whole profession will be ruined and lose its credibility”, Jan argued.

    Leisure

    Call for accountability

    Saulat Raza, who heads the Mass Communication department of the National University of Modern Languages in Islamabad, commented: “We discourage our students from getting involved with ‘yellow’ journalism, before releasing them into the media industry”. He calls for strong defamation laws and other means to hold journalists accountable for their actions, as no-one should be above the law.

    The students also have strong opinions against the practise of yellow journalism in Pakistan. Rizwan Ahmed, a student of Mass Communication, remarked: “Journalism is a noble profession and an occupation of great responsibility, but unfortunately it has been hijacked by the black sheep in our country. We should fight for objective journalism in Pakistan”.

    Sundus Ali, a researcher in an NGO based in Islamabad promoting media freedom said: “The yellow journalism elements in our media industry are increasing their numbers by the day. Despite our efforts to make this profession transparent, we are polluting it with policies and strategies which are anti-journalistic at the heart”.

    “There is a need for strong initiatives for the promotion of positive journalism, its ethics and its values”, the researcher added.

    Journalists should realise the importance of having a healthy profession. They should be reminded of their social responsibility and be discouraged from practising yellow journalism and publishing dubious news items.

    There is a need for proper professional journalistic training in this part of world, carried out by objective and renowned organisations in the media industry.

    Finally, there should be a code of conduct that binds all journalists and journalistic bodies, as well as strict defamation acts and laws.

    The authorities have acknowledged the necessity of such measures, but they are reluctant to take necessary steps and till this day, nothing has been done to address the situation.


    ——
    Photographs: by Clean Socks and Spiritless Visionary via Flickr.com, some rights reserved

  • 'Yellow journalism' and the curse of corruption in Pakistan's media 'Yellow journalism' and the curse of corruption in Pakistan's media

    Corruption has become an integral part of Pakistani journalism and the monopoly corrupt journalists exercise over the profession constitutes a challenge for all media practitioners, writes Malik Ayub Sumbal

  • Pakistan death row prisoners 'languish in jail' Pakistan death row prisoners 'languish in jail'

    More than 8,000 prisoners sentenced to death by Pakistani courts over the past 20 years still languish in jail, the Asian Human Rights Commission has said.

  • Pakistan Death Row Prisoners 'Languish' In Jail: Report Pakistan Death Row Prisoners 'Languish' In Jail: Report

    More than 8,000 prisoners sentenced to death by Pakistani courts over the past 20 years still languish in jail, the Asian Human Rights Commission has said.

  • No law or code of conduct against police torture No law or code of conduct against police torture

    The torture and violence by Pakistani police towards innocent people is not a concealed aspect of the country’s history and the media, civil society activists and human rights organisation time and again unveiled the brutal face of these beasts in the police uniform.

  •  PAKISTAN: No law or code of conduct against the torture that terms it as illegal practice PAKISTAN: No law or code of conduct against the torture that terms it as illegal practice

    The notorious Pakistani police torture and violence towards innocent people is not a concealed aspect of the country's history and the media, civil society activists and human rights organization time and again unveiled the brutal face of these beasts in the police uniform.

  •  Widow of Pakistani Shot by Raymond Davis Committed Suicide Widow of Pakistani Shot by Raymond Davis Committed Suicide

    “We want blood for blood.” Those were the last words of Shumaila Faheem, who committed suicide after swallowing poison pills on Sunday, February 6 as a protest affirming her belief that she would never receive justice for her husband's killing from the present regime.

  • Public Voice of Pakistan Denies Immunity for Raymond Davis Public Voice of Pakistan Denies Immunity for Raymond Davis

    "Raymond Davis must be tried under Pakistani laws," stated the nearly unanimous voice of Pakistanis as the masses express their anger and grief over the killing of two Pakistani nationals (whom they believe innocent) by Raymond Davis, a member of the U.S. embassy's technical administrative staff in Lahore, the second largest city of Pakistan.

  • Pakistani Govt Fails to Eradicate Polio Despite Millions in Funding Pakistani Govt Fails to Eradicate Polio Despite Millions in Funding

    Despite millions of dollars in funding for polio eradication, the Pakistani regime and its health department have failed to erase the scourge — owing to corruption.

    On January 24, Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari once again kicked off an anti-polio campaign, declaring that it would be "criminal negligence" not to wipe it out from the country. He acknowledged that polio is a crippling disease that continues to threaten children, adding that Pakistan is among only a few countries in the world that are still not completely polio-free.

  • Missing Persons and Intelligence Agencies Missing Persons and Intelligence Agencies

    Missing persons are a major human-rights issue in various countries. One niche of the missing persons saga is Asian nationals who went missing after 9/11, kidnapped by the world’s intelligence agencies. There are hundreds of people who went missing in the last several years from Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippine, China, Thailand, and Singapore.

  • More Pakistani Teens Choosing Gay and Lesbian Sex More Pakistani Teens Choosing Gay and Lesbian Sex

    A trend toward gay and lesbian sex in Pakistani society is rapidly emerging among teenage boys and girls.

    In Pakistan's so-called Islamic society, it is a great transgression even to discuss homosexuality, yet youths have been heading toward a sexual mutiny for a decade and a half.

    The new generation of Pakistan has rejected all the norms, values, and ethics of a Muslim society. They are totally Westernized and have adopted all the Western societies' norms and values.

  • Pakistan's ISI Summoned in the U.S. Court Pakistan's ISI Summoned in the U.S. Court

    The relations between the United States and Pakistan could be halted due to the recent summoning of the Pakistani top intelligence agency officials as well as other military men to appear before a U.S. court in Brooklyn, New York, this month for their alleged involvement in the 2008 terrorist bombings and shootings in Mumbai, India.

  • Pakistan Shows Signs of Turning Away From the United States Pakistan Shows Signs of Turning Away From the United States

    Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao's three-day visit to Pakistan in accompaniment with a huge business delegation, as well as subsequent statements and body language of the Pakistani politicians is a clear message of goodbye to the West.

  • The Failure of the United Nations' "One UN Joint Program" The Failure of the United Nations' "One UN Joint Program"

    The United Nations' "One UN Joint Program" has been a total failure in Pakistan owing to mismanagement and the apparent appointment of incompetent staff at the key administrative posts.

    The One UN Joint Program was a pilot project in which Pakistan was a test case regarding the initiation of a new methodology of working on UN projects in countries that need aid. According to project documents, the One UN methodology was instituted to circumvent replication of efforts by the UN on the development projects. Under this new methodology, all the departments of the United Nations are supposed to work with mutual cooperation and understanding.

  • The Failure of the United Nations' "One UN Joint Program" Written by  Malik Ayub Sumbal    font size     Print E-mail The United Nations' "One UN Joint Program" has been a total failure in Pakistan owing to mismanagement and the apparent appointment of in The Failure of the United Nations' "One UN Joint Program" Written by Malik Ayub Sumbal font size Print E-mail The United Nations' "One UN Joint Program" has been a total failure in Pakistan owing to mismanagement and the apparent appointment of in

    The Pakistani government and the public seem to be trying their best to achieve the top ranking amongst the most corrupt countries of the world. According to 2010 perception survey conducted by the Transparency International, Pakistan stands as the seventh most corrupt of the Asian Pacific countries and as the 34th most corrupt country in the world.

  • More Than 40 Killed by Suicide Bombers in Pakistan More Than 40 Killed by Suicide Bombers in Pakistan

    More than 40 people were killed December 6 in twin suicide blasts in the northwest of Pakistan. The twin blasts took place in the office of a political agent at Ghalanai, the main town in the tribal district of Mohmand, about 175 Kilometers away from the capital Islamabad, near the Afghan border. These blasts were carried out by two suicide bombers who disguised themselves in police uniforms.

  • Despite UN Funding, AIDS in Pakistan Is Spreading Unabated Despite UN Funding, AIDS in Pakistan Is Spreading Unabated

    World AIDS Day 2010 passed here in Islamabad, Pakistan, without any particular notable activity or pledge to renew the fight against AIDS. There was only a minor activity organized by the National Aids Control Program chaired by the Minister for Health in a local hotel.

  • Pakistanis Are Overstaying and Abusing Student Visas Pakistanis Are Overstaying and Abusing Student Visas

    More than 40,000 Pakistani nationals are in the United Kingdom on student visas that have been expired for several years, despite the fact that the Pakistanis are working at various outlets to earn a livelihood instead of studying to gain a degree.

  •  TMA launches drive against illegal structures TMA launches drive against illegal structures

    The Tehsil Municipal Administration, Rawal Town, has launched an operation against illegal buildings that were constructed without getting building and map plans approved from the building branch of the TMA.

  • RTA SECRETARY VISIT TO LAHORE RTA SECRETARY VISIT TO LAHORE

    A large number of people are facing problem in getting their vehicles released from the office of Regional Transport Authority (RTA) due to authority’s secretary, who is currently in Lahore on an official visit.

  • House of Bills itself owes a Rs54m gas bill! House of Bills itself owes a Rs54m gas bill!

    ISLAMABAD: The government is reluctant to pay the gas bill of the Parliament House, Islamabad, that has exceeded the huge figure of Rs 54.15 million and has not been paid since October 2009 to the Sui Northern Gas Pipeline Limited.

  • Committees constituted to scrutinise record of employees Committees constituted to scrutinise record of employees

    The Punjab government has constituted committees for inspection of service records of employees who were recruited by the former district governments throughout the province.

  • Pak-EPA witnesses shortage of executives Pak-EPA witnesses shortage of executives

    Islamabad

    Pakistan Environment Protection Agency (Pak-EPA) witnessing shortage of the higher cadre staff as the posts of three deputy directors and one director are vacant for the last two years while three deputy directors on leave and two directors on deputation.

  • Degrees of traffic wardens to be verified Degrees of traffic wardens to be verified

    Islamabad

    The degrees of about 6,825 traffic wardens would be verified and the traffic police authorities had distributed forms among them for the verification of their documents, sources said.

  • 12 govt departments owe SNGPL Rs105m 12 govt departments owe SNGPL Rs105m

    ISLAMABAD: Twelve major defaulters of the Sui Northern Gas Pipeline Limited owe the company a staggering Rs 105.88 million, including the Parliament House whose gas bills arrears have reached Rs 49.03 million.

  • Journalists protest blasphemous caricatures Journalists protest blasphemous caricatures

    ISLAMABAD: Hundreds of journalists protested here Monday in front of the Parliament House the competition of the blasphemous caricatures organized by a website facebook and demanded of the government to raise this issue at international platform and ban this website that is hurting sentiments of the Muslims.

  • Demo against blasphemous cartoons tomorrow Demo against blasphemous cartoons tomorrow

    ISLAMABAD: The journalist community announced a peaceful demonstration in front of Parliament House tomorrow (Monday) to protest the blasphemous cartoons by a website.